Image with the text "black spatial elegance: new cinematic language of global black music" hanging above nine circular photographs of BIPOC individuals and a pink circle in the, which reads the dates and titles of upcoming events.

Serious Tings

Wednesday, July 7, 5PM PT
Serious Tings
Wayne Chen in conversation with Steve “Urchin” Wilson + special guest Maxine Walters
Hosted by Henry Art Gallery + Partners to compliment the Gary Simmons: The Engine Room exhibition.
Event Link: https://fb.me/e/2QwTX66g8

MAXINE WALTERS has worked in film, music and entertainment production, public relations and marketing for nearly 40 years. She is a passionate Jamaican who delights in creative and cultural exchanges with friends and associates in sister islands of the Caribbean and worldwide. One of her earliest projects was co-founding the Reggae Sunsplash concert series in 1978. Maxine has worked on photo campaigns, commercials, video and film productions with Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Richard Branson, Puma, Adidas, and Nike. Her music video production credits include Lorde, Usain Bolt, Damian “Junior Gong” Marley, Lauren Hill, The Fugees, Beenie Man, and Wycleff Jean among others. Maxine has shared her production skills with students as visiting professor at La Escuela Internacional de Cine y Television, Cuba; the University of the West Indies, Barbados; and locally in Jamaica at The Creative Production and Training Centre (CPTC). Maxine Walters has produced 99% of the international commercials for the world’s fastest man, Usain Bolt.

Over the past 30 years she has also collected over 4,000 Jamaican Dancehall hand-painted and stenciled street signs, sometimes scaling walls, gullies and trees islandwide to retrieve worn or discarded pieces. Seeing their artistic merit, Maxine promoted and exhibited them locally and internationally, in New York, Berlin, Montreal, Los Angeles, New Orleans, during Art Basel Miami, and the Havana Biennale. She published Serious Things A Go Happen (2016), a book offering an “unofficial history of Jamaican dance hall music told through its graphic design”with a forward from author Marlon James, and essay contributions from Vivian Goldman and others. The book was critically received with features in the New Yorker, Vogue online and a documentary on the Arté channel. Book proceeds were given to the Kingston hospice named for her father, Consie Walters.

In 2017, the Government of Jamaica awarded her the Order of Distinction for promoting Jamaican culture internationally. She lives in rural Jamaica and sojourns in the capital city, Kingston.
Instagram @maxine.walters

STEVE “URCHIN” WILSON started his music journey working at Bob Marley’s legendary Tuff Gong record label as a marketing executive. He spent 10 years cross training in every imaginable area in the entertainment industry, and most notably as studio manager for the GeeJam Studios where he oversaw studio sessions for The Roots, Common, The Gorillaz, No Doubt & The Jungle Brothers amongst others. In 2001, Steve was signed on to help pilot what became the dizzying career of multi-platinum Grammy winner Sean Paul. As a reggae ambassador, Steve guided concert tours in over 100 countries, while also managing independent musicians locally. He also organized bringing EDM & house music to his home base of Kingston, Jamaica via his Brand New Machine (BNM) party series, platforming super DJs like Diplo, Bob Sinclair, CongoRock & Toddla T to spin on the island for the first time. He has gone on to export the BNM party concept to Montego Bay, Cayman, London & New York City.
IG @brandnewmachine

WAYNE CHRISTOPHER CHEN is Chairman of CVM Television, Jamaica’s Southern Regional Health Authority, and Petrojam. He is President of the Caribbean Employers Confederation, which represents 18 national employers’ organizations, and as a member of CARICOM’s Human Resource Development Commission. He was Jamaica Observer’s 1998 Business Leader of the Year and is co-author of “Reggae Routes: The Story of Jamaican Music” (1998 Temple University Press) and Executive Producer of Toots and the Maytals’s Grammy-nominated album “Ska Father” (1999).
Twitter @wcchen

ABOUT BLACK CINEMA COLLECTIVE:
Black Cinema Collective (f. 2019) is a Washington-based group of artists and cultural practitioners who examine and celebrate Black films through programmed screenings, watch parties, and community discussions focusing local and global filmmakers from African and Afro-Diasporic communities. We hold space for the complex existence and storytelling inventions of Black folx, also curating intersectional histories and topical stories seen in multidisciplinary forms of filmmaking from artists, activists, documentarians, and organizers. Through our work we explore the broad multiplicity of Afro-Diasporic cultures.
Website: blackcinemacollective.org
IG @blackcinemacollective
Twitter: @blackcinemacltv

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
ABOUT WA NA WARI:
Sited in a fifth-generation, Black-owned home, Wa Na Wari is an immersive community art project that reclaims Black cultural space and makes a statement about the importance of Black land ownership in gentrified communities. Our mission is to create space for Black ownership, possibility, and belonging through art, historic preservation, and connection. Referred to as a “container for Black joy,” Wa Na Wari incubates and amplifies Black art and belonging while providing a safe space for organizing and movement building. By renting a house from a vulnerable Black homeowner, and giving that space back to the Black community, Wa Na Wari is an active model for how Black art and culture can combat gentrification and displacement. Wanawari.org

ABOUT SIFF:
SIFF believes in film’s unique power to share original stories, diverse perspectives, and rich emotional journeys. Beginning in 1976 with the annual Seattle International Film Festival, then expanding into year-round programming, and our five-screen SIFF Cinema, we have offered experiences that bring people together to discover extraordinary films from around the world for nearly five decades. Our audiences allow us to take risks, host complex conversations, and truly appreciate film. Our programs include SIFF Cinema, Seattle International Film Festival, and SIFF Education. siff.net

ABOUT LANGSTON SEATTLE:
LANGSTON is a 501(c)(3) non-profit arts organization, established in 2016 to lead programming within the historic Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. LANGSTON guides generative programs and community partnerships that center Black art, artists and audiences and honor the ongoing legacy of Seattle’s Black Central Area. We support a variety of enriching programs, across multiple disciplines, rooted in our mission and values. langstonseattle.org

ABOUT HENRY ART GALLERY:
The Henry is internationally recognized for bold and challenging exhibitions, for pushing the boundaries of contemporary art and culture, and for being the first to premiere new works by established and emerging artists. Through individual experiences with art, we inspire visitors to upend their expectations and discover surprising connections henryart.org

Image with the text "black spatial elegance: new cinematic language of global black music" hanging above nine circular photographs of BIPOC individuals and a pink circle in the, which reads the dates and titles of upcoming events.

An Evolutionary History of Visual Art + Music

Thursday, June 24, 7PM PT
An Evolutionary History of Visual Art + Music
Presented by Cassidy Correia and Devan Kirk
Hosted by Black Cinema Collective & Partners
Event link: https://fb.me/e/2ryEPlODW

CASSIDY CORREIA is a first-generation student at the University of Washington, Seattle. She is majoring in International Studies with a focus in International Human Rights and minoring in Portuguese and Luso-Brazilian studies. With an indigenous Brazilian background, her current studies focus on the human rights of indigenous communities. Cassidy was born and raised in Seattle, Washington and has a deep connection to Seattle music scene.
IG @cassidygcorreia

DEVAN KIRK is a recent graduate from the University of Washington, where they just received their degree in Art and Anthropology. They were born and raised in Seattle, Washington and have been an active part of the University of Washington community, especially as a former track & field Student-Athlete. Devan also makes art in their spare time, typically using photography as their medium. He is planning to move to the Netherlands to study Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam in August!
http://www.kirkdevan.myportfolio.com
IG + Twitter @takkiatsu

ABOUT BLACK CINEMA COLLECTIVE:
Black Cinema Collective (f. 2019) is a Washington-based group of artists and cultural practitioners who examine and celebrate Black films through programmed screenings, watch parties, and community discussions focusing local and global filmmakers from African and Afro-Diasporic communities. We hold space for the complex existence and storytelling inventions of Black folx, also curating intersectional histories and topical stories seen in multidisciplinary forms of filmmaking from artists, activists, documentarians, and organizers. Through our work we explore the broad multiplicity of Afro-Diasporic cultures.
Website: blackcinemacollective.org
IG @blackcinemacollective
Twitter: @blackcinemacltv

COMMUNITY PARTNERS
ABOUT WA NA WARI:
Sited in a fifth-generation, Black-owned home, Wa Na Wari is an immersive community art project that reclaims Black cultural space and makes a statement about the importance of Black land ownership in gentrified communities. Our mission is to create space for Black ownership, possibility, and belonging through art, historic preservation, and connection. Referred to as a “container for Black joy,” Wa Na Wari incubates and amplifies Black art and belonging while providing a safe space for organizing and movement building. By renting a house from a vulnerable Black homeowner, and giving that space back to the Black community, Wa Na Wari is an active model for how Black art and culture can combat gentrification and displacement. Wanawari.org

ABOUT SIFF:
SIFF believes in film’s unique power to share original stories, diverse perspectives, and rich emotional journeys. Beginning in 1976 with the annual Seattle International Film Festival, then expanding into year-round programming, and our five-screen SIFF Cinema, we have offered experiences that bring people together to discover extraordinary films from around the world for nearly five decades. Our audiences allow us to take risks, host complex conversations, and truly appreciate film. Our programs include SIFF Cinema, Seattle International Film Festival, and SIFF Education. siff.net

ABOUT LANGSTON SEATTLE:
LANGSTON is a 501(c)(3) non-profit arts organization, established in 2016 to lead programming within the historic Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute. LANGSTON guides generative programs and community partnerships that center Black art, artists and audiences and honor the ongoing legacy of Seattle’s Black Central Area. We support a variety of enriching programs, across multiple disciplines, rooted in our mission and values. langstonseattle.org

ABOUT HENRY ART GALLERY:
The Henry is internationally recognized for bold and challenging exhibitions, for pushing the boundaries of contemporary art and culture, and for being the first to premiere new works by established and emerging artists. Through individual experiences with art, we inspire visitors to upend their expectations and discover surprising connections henryart.org

At the top in big red text reads “HOME Stories of Belonging.” Below displays event details that reads, “a special screening + community of Black Art films featuring: Adama Delphine Fuwundu, Crystal Z Campbell, Kamari Bright, and Mia Imani. Curated by Berette S Macaulay.” A black and red rectangle at the base reads, “presented by” with Black Cinema Collective and Wa Na Wari’s logo and “May 13 at 5:30 pm PST” written to the right.

HOME, STORIES of be/LONGING

HOME
STORIES OF be/LONGING

A special screening + communing of Black art films featuring:
Adama Delphine Fawundu
Crystal Z Campbell
Kamari Bright
Mia Imani

Presented by Black Cinema Collective and Wa Na Wari
Organized by Berette S Macaulay

The imaginative survivance
of settler colonial causation,
of generational displacement,
of occupation,
of reclamation,
seems a perennial r(e)volutionary act of co-creation throughout the Black diaspora.

Through culture-making, dream-scaping, linguistic coding, and embodied rituals of kinship that defy erasure across time, space, and circumstance, there are life-affirming rootings that remove the question of be/longing, and instead – perform it.

While we course-correct histories, how do we sustain our ancestral memories with witnessing and wonderment to cultivate new futures?
When considering the role of caretakers and storytellers, how do we nourish indigenous and diasporic kinfolk, and the earth?
How do we re-figure our co-existent “right to rights”, and our right to belong?

The works of our guest artists invite us to question what we know, and further what we remember, as thriving survivors offering a/new home to one another.

A cabinet contains a few small items: the heads and arms of tiny figures, a painting of a black woman in a blue dress, a white car that reads "race, kind, sort."

Lisa Myers Bulmash: Holding Patterns

How can this be “an unprecedented moment in history” when Black people have seen — and survived — even worse? We are so often the first to be hit by tragedy. Today COVID-19 kills nearly three times more African Americans than white people. Forty years ago, we were dying of AIDS faster than any other group; before that, tuberculosis. You could make similar points about police-involved killings, sexual predators, climate change forcing people out of their homes.

We are all waiting for what comes next. But it’s hard to tell if we’re waiting to touch down into a more humane future, or waiting for The End.

I may be stuck in this holding pattern with the pandemic, the racist fallout from the last four years, and my rage at feeling so vulnerable as a Black woman. But as I wait, I can transform these anxieties into collages, altered books and other works of art. I can attempt to bring something more loving, truthful and melanin-rich into existence. And I hope to show viewers that they are not alone in this precarious time.

Lisa Myers Bulmash is a collage and book artist who works primarily in acrylics, paper and found objects. Informally trained, Myers Bulmash began her career making handmade cards. After her father’s death in 2006, the artist felt compelled to take more personal risks in her creative life. Questions of identity, trust and the imperfect memory now drive most of her work. The artist aims to nudge the viewer into recognizing our shared stories, especially those narratives that are usually experienced in isolation.

Collage work by Myers Bulmash resides in two city art collections: Shoreline and Seattle. The latter includes art by Barbara Earl Thomas, Dale Chihuly and Kara Walker. She is also the winner of a Sustainable Arts Foundation grant, an award to support artists with children under age 18. The artist’s work and commentary have been highlighted in five books as well. Myers Bulmash exhibits her work in group and solo shows throughout the Seattle metro area. On the East Coast, she is represented by Morton Fine Art Gallery.

A vibrant and incredibly complex illustration of various intersecting and overlapping shapes and lines, predominantly in greens, blues, oranges, reds, black, and white.

Zahyr Lauren: Where Beauty Reigns: Visual Meditations

Zahyr Lauren, also known as The Artist L.Haz, creates in order to share light and love with community. Each piece is a time period of meditative peace for Zahyr. All of Z’s original artwork is hand-drawn.

Z is the youngest of four siblings from San Jose, California. Z comes from a powerful, southern Black matriarchy that migrated from Oklahoma and Mississippi to California with nothing, and made something for generations to come.
Z is a West Coast-based artist, humanstorian, former Human Rights Investigator, and former Attorney, who began drawing in 2015.

The practice of meditative art, for Z, has become a mental and emotional salve, helping to cope with the trauma of coming from the injustice system’s most heavily targeted community. The practice provides a meditative reprieve from the world, and the artist hopes the work engulfs other people in the same kind of peace that was felt during each work’s creation.

A rectangular mixed media piece made up of delicate yellow paper rectangles, connected at the edges to make a larger rectangle. Each piece has one black hairnet arranged into a different abstract shape that recalls topographic bodies, sea creatures, or an unknown alphabet.

Artist Talk: Lisa Jarrett, House/Field/Home

Lisa Jarrett’s work, House/Field/Home is currently on exhibit at Wa Na Wari. Join them for a virtual artist talk with Lisa, on September 1st, at 6pm.

Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89729059387?pwd=dUE0SHNjbG56cDJNQ3lVRWRRQVdsZz09
Meeting ID: 897 2905 9387
Passcode: 991689​

Lisa’s intersectional practice considers the politics of difference within a variety of settings including: schools, landscapes, fictions, racial imaginaries, studios, communities, museums, galleries, walls, mountains, mirrors, floors, rivers, and lenses. Lisa says she exists to make socially engaged work within the African Diaspora where the desires and limitations of representation are contentious sites. Much of her work contemplates the necessity of imagination as a person whose history, to a fault, is untraceable due to the violence of slavery in the United States and the ongoing attempts at cultural erasure that colonialism demands.

Recent drawings examine hair care and beauty regimens within Black femme culture. Lisa is curious about how our personal and private routines (and the attendant products and purchases) exist within our imaginations, conversations, and stories, and further signal how we represent ourselves. Our routines are rituals wherein we honor our experiences and claim beauty standards existing beyond and before dominant narratives. Lisa is curious about the time we take and how the money we spend moves in capitalist marketplaces. Lisa is curious about how we talk back and tether ourselves to our mothers and children through this signifying. Lisa is claiming the qualities of these ritual practices as drawing materials whose histories both trace and extend our lost languages and homelands. The drawing object becomes the mechanism by which different systems of value become visible and knowable.

About Lisa Jarrett:
Lisa Jarrett (Portland, OR) is an artist and educator who works as Assistant Professor of Community and Context Arts at Portland State University. She received her BFA from Rochester Institute of Technology (Rochester, NY) and holds an MFA from University of Montana (Missoula, MT). She is co-founder and co-director of KSMoCA (King School Museum of Contemporary Art); Harriet Tubman Center for Expanded Curatorial Practice–both in NE Portland, OR; and the artists collective Art 25: Art in the 25th Century. Her intersectional practice considers the politics of difference within a variety of settings including: schools, landscapes, fictions, racial imaginaries, studios, communities, museums, galleries, walls, mountains, mirrors, floors, rivers, and lenses. She exists and makes socially engaged work within the African Diaspora. Jarrett exhibits nationally and has recently produced projects for Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and was awarded a Joan Mitchell Award for Painters and Sculptors grant in 2018.