Two figures lying on the floor are tangled, limbs intertwined, and knit together using a number of soft textured and multi-patterned fabrics.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron: Celaje

Through a combination of hand-sewn textiles and paints, Capron joins together an array of patterns and striking colors to fashion bodily forms. Merging figuration with abstraction, these works explore cultural hybridity, pride, and the competing desires to assimilate and to be seen. 

Figures bleed in and out of the foreground, most gazing off somewhere, with mountain, cloud, sun, water, structure, and path all blended and pinkish, the ground blood red.

Maia Cruz Palileo: Long Kwento

Palileo recontextualizes these stories, portraits, and images in an attempt to resuscitate these figures from the exploitative gaze of these ethnographic images.

Numerous variously shaped plates hung in a loose cluster on a white wall. Each plate is decorated with a different scene, primarily in one color, such as cobalt blue, orange, turquoise, vermillion, gray, and purple. The scenes reference 18th century illustration style.

Julie Green: Fashion Plate

Beginning in 18th century France, fashion plate prints introduced buyers to current fashion trends. Engravings collaged with silk or velvet depicted women in the latest styles.  Green’s Fashion Plate extends this tradition to encompass contemporary fashion, gender, and identity, intertwined with the artist’s personal narratives.

Trading card-sized paintings using low-end materials like fabric paint, polymer clay, found fabrics and fibre tip pens explore ideas around desire, biodiversity, and otherness

Craig Calderwood: Summoners

In Summoners, Calderwood attempts to think with the ideas and processes around a variety of kinds of persona building, Be it LARPing, Fursonas, Drag, or even the most common LARP event, Halloween.